Video evidence released Epstein did not Kill Himself Epstein coverup

Video evidence released by Project Veritas!!! Does it show a coverup? Why did NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill is resigning after 3-year tenure?

BREAKING: @abcnews anchor @arobach caught on ‘hot mic’ in August disgustedly exposing networks decision to strategically spike bombshell investigation into Jefferey Esptein over THREE YEARS AGO.

Says what she had was “unbelievable” : https://youtu.be/3lfwkTsJGYA

#Whistleblower #DeepStateCoup #DeepStateCorruption The Intra-Administration War in Vietnam

#Whistleblower #DeepStateCoup #DeepStateCorruption The Intra-Administration War in Vietnam

 

Kennedy’s warning regarding his adversary – the CIA – and the possibility of the overthrow of the United States government by that so-called “intelligence” agency one month before he was murdered. Kennedy was trying to warn the nation of the dangers of an unelected and unaccountable power in the United States that was pursuing its own foreign policy outside the legitimate channels of government. As we have seen from Jim Garrison’s investigation and Mark Lane’s book, Plausible Denial, the CIA was very much involved in the death of President John F. Kennedy. The original New York Times article by Arthur Krock can be found below.

Tweetable

 this same Coup  was predicted by JFK watch this short segment 
#Whistleblower 
#DeepStateCoup #DeepStateCorruption 
#WWG1GWA  #CIA #WhistleblowerGate 

TheIntra-administrationWarInVietnam-newYorkTimes1963-10-03

#ProtectourPOTUS #POTUS45 #KAG 

https://youtu.be/qC990Q0_Jv0

Comey “Burned” by his own words….. Report of Investigation of Former Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey

PDF file Here

Comey “Burned” by his own words…..

“By not safeguarding sensitive information obtained during the course of his FBI employment, and by using it to create public pressure for official action, Comey set a dangerous example for the over 35,000 current FBI employees”

 

As Comey himself explained in his March 20, 2017 testimony before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, he was unable to provide details about the nature or scope of the FBI’s ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election because

the FBI is very careful in how we handle information about our cases and about the people we are investigating…. Our ability to share details with the Congress and the American people is limited when those investigations are still open, which I hope makes sense. We need to protect people’s privacy…. We just cannot do our work well or fairly if we start talking about it while we’re doing it.

 

However, after his removal as FBI Director two months later, Comey provided a copy of Memo 4, which Comey had kept without authorization, to Richman with instructions to share the contents with a reporter for The New York Times. Memo 4 included information that was related to both the FBI’s ongoing investigation of Flynn and, by Comey’s own account, information that he believed and alleged constituted evidence of an attempt to obstruct the ongoing Flynn investigation; later that same day, The New York Times published an article about Memo 4 entitled, “ Comey Memo Says Trump Asked Him to End Flynn Investigation.” The responsibility to protect sensitive law enforcement information falls in large part to the employees of the FBI who have access to it through their daily duties. On occasion, some of these employees may disagree with decisions by prosecutors, judges, or higher ranking FBI and Department officials about the actions to take or not take in criminal and counterintelligence matters. They may even, in some situations, distrust the legitimacy of those supervisory, prosecutorial, or judicial decisions. But even when these employees believe that their most strongly-held personal convictions might be served by an unauthorized disclosure, the FBI depends on them not to disclose sensitive information. Former Director Comey failed to live up to this responsibility. By not safeguarding sensitive information obtained during the course of his FBI employment, and by using it to create public pressure for official action, Comey set a dangerous example for the over 35,000 current FBI employees—and the many thousands more former FBI employees—who similarly have access to or knowledge of non-public information. Comey said he was compelled to take these actions “if I love this country…and I love the Department of Justice, and I love the FBI.” However, were current or former FBI employees to follow the former Director’s example and disclose sensitive information in service of their own strongly held personal convictions, the FBI would be unable to dispatch its law enforcement 60

duties properly, as Comey himself noted in his March 20, 2017 congressional testimony. Comey expressed a similar concern to President Trump, according to Memo 4, in discussing leaks of FBI information, telling Trump that the FBI’s ability to conduct its work is compromised “if people run around telling the press what we do.” This is no doubt part of the reason why Comey’s closest advisors used the words “surprised,” “ stunned,” “ shocked,” and “disappointment” to describe their reactions to learning what Comey had done. We have previously faulted Comey for acting unilaterally and inconsistent with Department policy.103 Comey’s unauthorized disclosure of sensitive law enforcement information about the Flynn investigation merits similar criticism. In a country built on the rule of law, it is of utmost importance that all FBI employees adhere to Department and FBI policies, particularly when confronted by what appear to be extraordinary circumstances or compelling personal convictions. Comey had several other lawful options available to him to advocate for the appointment of a Special Counsel, which he told us was his goal in making the disclosure. What was not permitted was the unauthorized disclosure of sensitive investigative information, obtained during the course of FBI employment, in order to achieve a personally desired outcome.